How Chronic illness changed me

Hello, today I want to make a  post about how my chronic illness (Most likely endo) changed me. Because that’s what it did. It changed me, a lot. In some ways good, and in most ways bad. Anyways let’s get started.

I guess the first change was that I went from being an active child to an inactive one. The year I got sick I played tag rugby and I remember having to sit out of some sessions because I felt so nauseous and I was in too much pain to play. I remember having pain when we played at the Hampshire games, but I had to play through it because I couldn’t let the team down or play on to my family that I was sick. I used to go to scouts and I quit that too. Because my periods gave me diarrhea and my cramps were so bad at that time of the month that the last thing I wanted was to do the runny around activities so my parents said they wouldn’t pay anymore because they thought I didn’t want to go anymore. I couldn’t tell them how ill my periods were making me feel, not my dad because he’s a man and not my mum because all she’d have said was “get over it.” I quit swimming because I couldn’t go once a month and I started finding that painful and made me nauseous throughout the month. It just stopped being a pleasant activity. Come year 9 I had quit horseriding because for years when I was having pain flares it made it worse and again, it just stopped being enjoyable because of that.

I became isolated and withdrawn. And while I was still young (age 11-14)I would moan to friends and go to the medical room a lot of the time. It annoyed people, people thought I was faking and doing it for attention. Even my own dad who found out because a friends parent phoned in concern. And then there were the constant thoughts I was just weak, and honestly,I still have to battle these on occasion. Why could I not deal with periods when everyone else could? I thought it was normal to feel so shitty all the time and I don’t think it helped that I had a couple of friends who shall not be named who were weak and did stay off school when they were on and got their parents to write notes out of PE  when I can guarantee they were in nowhere near as much pain as I was. These were friends who missed PE because they’d had their braces tightened. (Which yes it does hurt but not that much.) And friends who sat out and cried after being hit with a tennis ball. (Which again a pain that really does not warrant that.) I remember not being able to use tampons because getting them in was so painful and my mum said I had to deal with it. And then she said Bethany Hamilton can deal with her periods and so I should too?  (I was obsessed with Bethany Hamilton at the time) And again it made me feel weak. A couple of years later I forced tampons in regardless of the issues I had with them because I felt gross without them and thought other women would somehow judge me for still using pads at 15.

And obviously, this all had a huge impact on my mental health. Going from an active child to a teenager who can barely manage to focus during school and do homework does that. All I did was sit on my laptop and immerse myself in TV shows and that was my life. I became depressed because I could no longer do the things I loved and I was so confused as to why I was feeling the way I did. I became depressed because I confused over what was wrong yet feeling like I was just weak at the same time. I was going google crazy even at the age of 11 and nothing seemed to fit, not until I came across endo and even then sometimes I still find myself believing I’m weak because I don’t have an official diagnosis and I’ve never passed out because of the pain and only actually vomited once. (Only vomited once in the last 9 years mind you.) And quite frankly I was scared. Scared it was something serious yet not being able to summon up the words to say I need help.

This in turn lead to me becoming anorexic. (Well along with the random weight loss between year 9 and 10 of school) I was already restricting on and off from the age of 13 but I would say it was more disordered eating that eating disorer at the time. And yes the anorexia removed my pain for  a time  and it made my periods a lot lighter but that doesn’t make Anorexia a good thing. Anorexia made my relationship with my mum deteriorate even further, a relationship which still hasn’t been able to be fixed and probably never will.

Looking back you’d think I could go back in time and change it all. And yes there are things I had wished I’d done differently. I wish I’d opened up to my parents more. Seen doctors. Got tests. Answers. Gone to A&E on the occasions I thought I might have appendicitis. But I certainly do not wish this never happened to me in the first place. I feel like going through everything has made me one strong ass bitch. Someone who is able to continue on her life despite excruciating pain. Someone who has pushed through for the last 2 months because it’s either that or lay in bed and let myself become depressed again.Someone who is grateful for when she feels well.

It’s made me a better person. Someone who’s more understanding of people who can’t work. People who do experience chronic illnesses and people who suffer from mental illnesses. An understanding I am sure I would not have gained otherwise just due to my parents and certain other family members influences.

So I guess despite all the bad things I would say I’m grateful for everything I’ve been through because it’s made me a better person. Although I do hope my last couple of months pain and all other symptoms have just been flares and not a sign that it’s got worse or cancer because I’m going to uni in a week and I need a job because my parents will belittle me until I get one and not support me financially even if the reason I can’t manage work is due to actual physical pain.

I guess the one reason I wish I had a formal diagnosis and had seen doctors in the past is so that people may be more understanding of me.

Mental hunger?

Hello again, back with another eating disorder recovery focused post because since my period ended (so friday) I’ve been crazy mentally hungry but the physical hunger still isn’t where it was before I started feeling sick again.

I feel like if you google mental hunger you get given a series of articles about how to ignore your mental hunger or emotional hunger as it can sometimes be called. It seems as if having mental hunger is sinful. But that’s not true. Mental hunger especially during and after a period of restriction or illness is totally normal and in reality, is just our body’s way of saying it needs food, it needs nourishment to get us out of that caloric deficit we somehow ended up in.

There’s nothing shameful or sinful about it.Which I myself have found myself feeling in the past, like I was greedy for eating despite no physical hunger. Yet what I failed to realise is  Just like physical hunger, it’s something that we should listen to and we should respond adequately, giving our body’s the food it needs. The energy it needs because that’s all food is after all. It’s energy.

Normal people don’t always wait until they’re physically hungry or physically hungry enough. Normal people do respond to mental hunger at times because that’s what being carefree around food and eating as you fancy is. It’s being able to respond to all hunger both mental and physical.

So I encourage everyone experiencing this to embrace it and accept it. Your body wouldn’t want the food if it didn’t need it.