I stopped exercising for 3 weeks and…

Hello beautiful angels who read my blog post. So the title gives this one away a little. My writings today will be about me stopping exercise for 3 weeks and the effects of that.

Now. Nothing drastic happened. I don’t think I’ve gained any weight and if I have my clothes still fit so who cares really. Basically I haven’t ballooned into some obese monstrosity, so if any of you feel you need a break from exercise for one reason or another please take it. It won’t kill you.

But onto the more negative stuff.

I ached A LOT! From head to toe all the time. As someone with a chronic illness I’m used to pain. I’m used to things hurting and as someone who has been stupid and overexercised in the past I’m used to the little niggling recurring injuries. But this was different. I feel like my body may have been punishing me for physically not having the time or spoons to exercise. Everything was also a lot tighter than usual. And I’m not saying I’m a flexible person. I’m far from it. But everything was noticeably tight.

Then I started exercising again because I had nothing else to do, so it was worth the spoons it takes and things started aching a lot less and feeling a lot less tight.

So I guess the point is that it’s always important to make time and spoons for exercise. i.e prioritising it over other things. I’m not talking about anything crazy intense here or anything that has to take up more than 10 minutes of your commitment 3-4 times a week. But apparently exercise really does help keep us as healthy as possible.

To people who have never experienced the hardship of mental/chronic illnesses…

Please be kind, we are incredibly fragile people. We break easily. Both literally and metaphorically speaking. We need treating with care. Please remember this before you say anything judgemental.

Please don’t say any of the below list:

  • Why don’t you just try? – We are trying. So much more than you can see. Unfortunately, us spoonies have to try so hard just to appear as a normal functioning human being, so on some occasions our work may appear to be lacking.
  • But quitting’s a bit stupid/There’s no point in just giving up – No it’s not and yes there is a point. We need to prioritise our health in whatever way possible. This  may mean quitting a job  because it’s harming our mental health so much. Or taking a year out of college because we’re too physically ill to cope with the demands.
  • It’s not that hard really – Maybe not to you but for us it is. Remember we are different people, have different experiences and handle things differently. Yes you may find it easy to lead a group or socialise but for others of us leading a large group puts us on the brink of a mental breakdown and you’re not helping this with the constant criticism
  • Maybe it’s not the job it’s you – Thanks, just more reassurance that I’m a useless piece of crap that deserves no place in this world. Thanks.
  • Any judgement on why we don’t work etc. – Again, not helpful. Maybe put yourself in my shoes for once. Try spending 9 years of your life terrified your dying of a serious illness with no one to confide in, only to find what you likely have is lifelong, life damaging and can only be diagnosed through surgery. Having depression and anxiety with minimal support. Try self recovering from anorexia. Then see how much time you can allocate to a job on top of your study demands.
  • Just get on with it – Really? I am in severe pain, have a whole host of other symptoms and a lot of mental crap going on in my head on a regular basis and you’re telling me to just get on with it? I’m doing the best I can, and that’s all that should ever matter.
  • Why don’t you… “Go vegan” “Try Yoga” “take x,y,z” “get out more.” etc. I’m sure we’ve all heard all of this before. However kind of a place in you’re heart that these suggestions come from they really don’t help. Trust me a lot of us have tried it all so we don’t need your stereotypical suggestions. Unfortunately for a lot of us these suggestions will never fix us and only ever provide minimal relief.
  • Are you okay? – I guess it depends on how you say it and who you are with this one  because sometimes it can be a blessing, but with some people this just really bugs me. Like of course I’m not okay but I’m not going to open up to you when I either barley know you or you speak in that condescending way. On top of that it’s been so long now that I have a standardised yes response to most people, even when I’m in severe pain and it feels like the whole world is crashing down.
  • You’re a burden – Or anything that could have that effect. A burden is the last thing that we want to be. Don’t tell us this, please. It hurts so much.
  • You’re just doing it for attention – No we are not. This is real. Telling us we’re doing this for attention isn’t at all helpful it makes us doubt ourselves even more than we probably already do.
  • You need a hobby – You know what I agree, a proper hobby would be nice. A sport maybe. But the reality is for some of us, working full time or studying full time can take so much away from us that things we once enjoyed are slowly taken away and slowly become less and less frequent things to enjoy. There’s a long list of things I did but have ended up now not doing regularly because it either hurt too much or was too exhausting to carry out after the days commitments have been completed.

I’m sure there are a million more things that people shouldn’t say but will keep it to this for now. Just please even if you can’t empathise at all try and be a little more understanding of peoples individual circumstances. You never know the full story so try not to pass such judgement on their character or work ethic.